Workshops, Professional Development Workshops

Oct
26
Wed
2016
Fall Statewide Conference: Celebrating the Social Studies @ Holiday Inn & Suites-Marlborough
Oct 26 @ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies present

2016 Statewide One-Day Fall Conference: Celebrating the Social Studies

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2016

DOWNLOAD/PRINT INDIVIDUAL REGISTRATION FORMS: [WORD] [PDF]
DOWNLOAD/PRINT TEAM REGISTRATION FORMS: [WORD] [PDF]

ONLINE REGISTRATION AVAILABLE – CLICK HERE

Holiday Inn & Suites – Marlborough
265 Lakeside Avenue, Marlborough, Massachusetts

Plimoth Plantation (full day program)
Plymouth, Massachusetts

Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies (Mass Council) is proud to announce it will host its annual one-day statewide fall conference on Wednesday, October 26, 2016, at the Holiday Inn & Suites-Marlborough, located at 265 Lakeside Avenue in Marlborough, Massachusetts. There is also a full-day program at Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts (with an additional admission fee of $30).

This year’s theme is Celebrating the Social Studies. The social studies is a large academic field that explores who we are as people—as social beings—not only in our own local community but in the global society. The field also focuses on how civilizations have thrived on this planet for tens of thousands of years and continue to exist today. Studying the social studies allows all of us to learn what it means and what it takes to be a global citizen; to be a contributing member of society and the human race. The social studies include but is not limited to the study of history, geography, economics, sociology, psychology, civics and government, political science and international relations, and anthropology; all of which collectively brings greater and richer contexts to understanding classical and contemporary literature, the arts, music, science, and human relationships. Without the social studies, there is no history; and without history, there is no future. There is much to celebrate the social studies because it is about society, it is about us, and it is about life today and tomorrow.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: CHRIS HAKALA
Chris Hakala is a Professor of Psychology at Quinnipiac University. Professor Hakala has always been interested in how people learn and remember things they either hear or read. He studies these issues from the perspective of a cognitive psychologist. As the Director of Teaching and Learning, he measures the effectiveness of various classroom teaching techniques, technology in the classroom and the impact of high school psychology on college level learning. The Massachusetts Teachers of Psychology are happy to welcome Professor Hakala for a fun and informative evening.

EARN ONE (1) GRADUATE CREDIT FROM FRAMINGHAM STATE UNIVERSITY / $179.00
Requires attendance and participation at the Fall Conference in Marlborough (October 26, 2016) and Northeast Regional Conference for the Social Studies (NERC) at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the U.S. Senate in Dorchester/Boston (April 3-4, 2017). Assignments include final paper and annotated lesson unit/plans. Register for the course at the fall conference. MORE DETAILS COMING SOON!


 

Below are the scheduled workshops for the conference:
 
Report and Discussion of ESE Civics and History-Social Studies Initiative
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (MA DESE)
All subjects and levels
In the last year, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has launched a number of initiatives to foster student learning in history-social studies. These initiatives range from establishing a task force to examine how to support effective practices and greater involvement of students in civic learning to the revision of the MA History and Social Science Curriculum Framework. This workshop will provide participants with an update on current initiatives and a forum for discussion with members of the Civic Learning and Engagement Task Force, a group of practitioners, scholars and Department staff members who are gathering feedback from the field that will inform these initiatives. 

King Philip’s War and Cultural Conflicts in New England
Mass Historical Society and Leventhal Map Center at Boston Public Library
Grades 6-12
Investigate multiple perspectives with maps, artifacts, and documents related to native-colonist relations in 1600s New England. Key figures include: Metacom (a.k.a. King Philip), Josiah Winslow (Governor of Plymouth Colony), and Mary Rowlandson (English colonist captured by Native Americans during the war). Teachers will work in small groups to analyze primary sources, such as John Seller’s 1675 map of New England, and brainstorm an inquiry-based activity related to the war and 17th century native-colonist relations.

Teaching Psychology of Addiction
TBA
 

Center for Civic Education: We the People
Roger Desrosiers, Massachusetts Center for Civic Education
Grades 5-12
The We The People program is designed to promote civic competence and responsibility among elementary and secondary students. The program enhances students’ understanding of the institutions and principles of American constitutional democracy. The culminating activity is a simulated congressional hearing in which students “testify” before a panel of judges. This provides students with an interactive way to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of constitutional principles and to evaluate, take, and defend positions of relevant historical and contemporary issues.  This program has been recognized as a great tool to increase literacy, research, writing and oral skills for students of all ages.

Center for Civic Education: Project Citizen
Massachusetts Center for Civic Education
Grades K-12
Civic participation is a corner stone of our government. And it is civic particpation that has moved our country forward in its struggle for justice and civil rights. The workshop stresses the connection between good citizenship and civic participation.  This presentation introduces The People: Project Citizen instructional program. Rational, goals and outcomes will be discussed. This workshop will include two lesson demonstrations that clearly show the strengths of the program. A completed project will be available to view.

John Adams Courthouse: Justice on Freedom Trail
Richard Desorgher, John Adams Courthouse
Grades 6-8
The John Adams Courthouse comes alive at this workshop; participants will become aware of what the John Adams Courthouse has to offer on an educational basis for their students, for classroom resources and for field trip possibilities. The John Adams Courthouse will be celebrating the social studies through exhibit displays, courtroom visits, visits with justices and tours of one of Boston’s most elegant and historic19th century buildings. The themes of civics, political science, law, justice, history and politics will ring throughout the workshop.

Geography in Today’s Classroom
Massachusetts Geographic Alliance
Grades K-8
This session will share ideas, resources and instructional strategies for engaging students in geography lessons.  interdisciplinary lessons, project-based learning and collaborative activities will presented.

State of Geography Today
Massachusetts Geographic Alliance, Bridgewater State University
All levels
Co-Directrors of the Massachuetts Geographic Alliance will share information regarding state and national initiatives focused on geographic education. Important session as we prepare tomorrow’s global citizens.

Creating a Family Geography Night
Rob Poirier, Massachusetts Geographic Alliance
Grades PK-8
This workshop will give presenters information for hosting a Geography Night at their school. This event has become a highlight for students, staff and the community in North Andover. The event grows each year. Presenter will take participants step-by-step through the planning to host their own event.

Massachusetts Floor Map
National Geographic Society; Massachusetts Geographic Alliance
Grades 3-8
National Geographic Society recently developed large floor maps for every state. In this session, the teachers who created the lessons will present activities and ideas for using this traveling map in your school. Find out how to have the Massachusetts visit your school.    

Historical Perspectives of Arab-Israelli Conflict and Peace
Jacqueline Regev
Grades 9-12
Participants will develop pedagogic content knowledge including:  The origins of Arab Nationalism and Zionism, The connections among the broken promises made to Arabs and Jews during World War I and current challenges in the Middle East, The challenges and benefits of a peaceful resolution to the Arab-Israeli conflict Participants will be able to:  Discuss the Arab-Israeli conflict from an academic perspective, Deliver rigorous, standards-based instruction, meeting state social studies content standards, Engage students with primary and secondary source documents, Utilize at least two new literacy strategies

Building Understanding
Grades PK-8
This workshop presents a holistic approach by blending the units of study together and using buildings from around the world to approach the mini units as a bigger and interwoven set of ideas. The idea is to give each small group of students a different iconic building from different parts in the world. Student then research the geography, culture and economy of each location from the time the building was built. Community building activity will be shared that becomes a visual reminder for students about the importance of kindness and patience towards one another

Understanding Judaism
Jacqueline Regev
Grades 6-12
Participants will develop content knowledge and explore standards-based curricular resources, aligned with Common Core and the C3 framework, to support instruction in Ancient Civilizations, World Religions, and U.S. History Courses. Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to: Discuss Judaism from an academic perspective; engage students with primary and secondary source documents; and determine which ICS lesson meets their students’ instructional needs.

Primary Sources for all: Library of Congress
Josue Sakata, Boston Public Schools; Richard Cairn, Collaborative for Educational Services
Grades PK-12
Photos, drawings, maps, film, recorded music, sheet music, advertisements, broadsides from the Library of Congress can help make Social Studies accessible to ALL students.

Power of Stories
Jonathan Bassett, Newton North High School; Gary Shiffman, Brookline High School
Grades 9-12
Jon Bassett and Gary Shiffman are the creators of the “Four Question Method,” a simple way to help history teachers and students focus on the content and skills that really matter. In this workshop teachers will learn specific techniques for building units and lessons clearly around compelling narratives, and for coaching their students to use storytelling skills to demonstrate understanding of the history they learn. You’ll walk out with useful tools for planning, teaching, and assessing.

WWII/Vietnam: The Home Front
Harriet Kulig, Springfield Armory National Historic Site
Grades 9-12
The Springfield Armory National Historic Site offers a vast collection of primary resources on WWII through Vietnam. By exploring the effects of these wars on the Armory as a community, participants will examine the social change that occurred as women and African Americans joined the workforce to produce weapons. Finally participants will examine the effects of the wars on Veterans through the use of oral history. Teachers will receive free primary resources and learning strategies from the Springfield Armory National Historic Site collection examining WWII and Vietnam eras through classroom and fieldtrip activities.

A New Look at Thanksgiving
FULL DAY PROGRAM AT PLIMOTH PLANTATION (additional $30 admission fee)
Vickie Oman and staff, Plimoth Plantation
Grades PK-12
This full day session will be held at Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth from 9 AM – 3 PM.  For the first part of the day, teachers will participate in sessions on primary sources, Wampanoag culture, artifacts and the Story of Thanksgiving.  Teachers will have an opportunity to discuss representing native cultures in the classroom, then spend the afternoon visiting the Wampanoag Homesite and the 17th Century Village looking through a new lens.  Lunch may be purchased at the Patuxet Café at the Plantation, or bring a lunch.  The workshop is appropriate for elementary teachers. 
Teachers should report directly to Pilmoth Plantation, Plymouth, MA no later than 8:45 a.m. Program begins promptly at 9:00 a.m.