All Events, Conferences & Workshops

As a service to members of the Massachusetts Council and the wider social studies community, third party events may be posted in this calendar. Third party events are not endorsed by the MCSS board.

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Oct
12
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – Dec 21 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Oct
26
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 26 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Jan 4 2021 @ 8:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Nov
2
Mon
2020
EarthView: World Beyond Borders @ virtual
Nov 2 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

EarthView: World Beyond Borders

November 2, 2020 at 3:00 p.m. [Register here]
2 hour webinar and virtual field trip

Dr. James Hayes-Bohanan & Dr.  Vernon Domingo
Bridgewater State University Department of Geography
Featuring Kevin Bean & Moderator Andrea Weng
https://www.bridgew.edu/earthview
Blog: http://bsu-earthview.blogspot.com/2020/10/evonline-at-nerc-2020.html

This workshop begins with a virtual field trip to EarthView, a 20-foot, inflatable globe that serves as a portable classroom for social studies, geography, earth science and more — any discipline that benefits from a global or regional perspective. The field trip will include presentations made both outside the globe and inside (drones may be involved) and on some of the continental and Massachusetts floor maps that comprise the EarthMap portion of the program.

Following the field trip, we will reflect on what we have learned from the twelve years we have spent (so far) using these large-scale maps with well over 100,000 students, educators, and the general public. Finally, we will share resources for exploring patterns and connections — human, physical and environmental — at a global scale using resources available for remote learning on flat screens. The workshop will model the use of maps to learn about the spatial dimensions of such topics as water scarcity, climate change, wildfire, migration, and both the causes and consequences of Coronavirus spread.

EarthView site, including program information, reservations, and fees: https://www.bridgew.edu/earthview

Vernon Domingo is Professor Emeritus of Geography and James Hayes-Bohanan is Professor of Geography, both at Bridgewater State University in southeastern Massachusetts. Vernon’s main areas of teaching and research have been political geography, the geography of Africa, and the geography of access to water. James has specialized in environmental geography, the geography of Latin America, and the geographies of coffee.

Both Vernon and James have long been active in the preparation of future teachers, the continuing education of in-service teachers, and advocacy for geography education. Since 2008, they have been more directly involved in K-12 education as co-coordinators of Project EarthView, bringing them into contact with thousands of students and scores of teachers each year. The two giant globes and seven National Geographic floor maps have been used by almost 120,000 geography learners to date, from infancy to infinity.

RESOURCES:

Nov
4
Wed
2020
Teach the History and Struggle for Voting Rights @ virtual
Nov 4 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Teach the History and Struggle for Voting Rights

Wednesday, November 4, 2020 at 4:15 p.m. [Register here]
Carolyn Jacobs and Sue Wilkins, GBH and PBS Learning Media
One hour webinar

Introduce students to the history of voting in America and the key figures who have fought for access to the ballot box for all using powerful media from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE and FRONTLINE.  We’ll share resources available free on PBS LearningMedia and explore ways to effectively integrate them into your instruction. The presenters are Sue Wilkins, GBH Director of Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction and Karen Pleasant, teacher, Stoneleigh-Burnam School, Greenfield, MA.

Theme: Under-represented voices in American history
Audience: Middle and high school students, all subjects

Nov
5
Thu
2020
Preparing Citizens For A World of Migration @ virtual
Nov 5 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Preparing Citizens For A World of Migration

Thursday, November 5, 2020 at 3:00 p.m. [Register here]
60-minute webinar

Adam Strom, adam@reimaginingmigration.org

We live in an era of mass migration. In the United States, 26% of school-aged youth are either immigrants or the children of immigrants. They form just a slice of the one billion people on the move around the world. It is in this context that young people – whether they are part of an arriving or receiving culture – strive to form their identities as learners, community members, and change-makers. While history education has the potential to help young people put today’s experiences in context, myths and misinformation about the past get in the way of a deeper understanding of the experience of migration on individuals, communities, and nations. At the same time, academically rigorous exploration of the past can provide perspective and insight into today’s choices, dilemmas, and experiences of migration.

In this interactive session designed for in-service middle and high school teachers, educators from Re-Imagining Migration will introduce a culturally relevant framework, resources, and strategies for teaching about migration in ways that promote student’s understanding of citizenship in an age of migration as well as their social, emotional, academic, and civic growth. Using primary sources and historical case studies, participants will critically engage text and participate in small and large group discussion while considering fundamental questions about the  human experience such as: What does citizenship mean in an age of migration? Why do people leave their homes and what happens to our identities while crossing borders? What factors influence how communities respond to migration? What are the ways that communities receive and integrate newcomers? What can we do to build more inclusive and sustainable societies?

At a time when more and more families are either on the move, across national borders, or connected to family members who are migrants, traditional understanding of citizenship is being challenged by patterns of migration as well as those who would seek to restrict membership. In greater Boston, over 50% of the population are immigrants or their descendants. However, some politicians argue that birthright citizenship, and the constitutionally guaranteed rights that are associated with it, should not be granted automatically.

To prepare young people, immigrant-origin youth, or their peers, we need to help them understand both histories and patterns of migration to inform their understanding of and perspectives regarding one of the most important civic issues of our time.

Featured Resources:

Nov
9
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Nov 9 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Jan 18 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Nov
18
Wed
2020
Teach “McCarthyism” and its Current Relevance @ virtual
Nov 18 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Teach “McCarthyism” and its Current Relevance

Wednesday, November 18, 2020 at 4:15 p.m. [Register here]
Carolyn Jacobs and Sue Wilkins, GBH and PBS Learning Media
One hour webinar

Teach students about the strengths and limits of democratic institutions, including a “free press” using digital resources drawn from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE | McCarthy: Power Feeds on Fear. We’ll explore the resources available free on PBS LearningMedia and share ways to effectively use them in your instruction.  Presenters will be Sue Wilkins, WGBH Director, Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction and a social studies educator.

Theme: Preparing students to hold “The Office of Citizen”
Audience: Middle and high school students, all subjects

Nov
23
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Nov 23 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Feb 1 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Dec
4
Fri
2020
2020 NCSS Virtual Conference @ virtual
Dec 4 – Dec 6 all-day

2021 marks 100 years of NCSS service to social studies teachers, administrators, and professionals.

To celebrate this moment in the history of social studies education, NCSS is planning a year-long experience of signature events, starting with our first-ever NCSS Virtual Conference: Advancing Social Justice from December 4-6, 2020. With our partners, the American Bar Association’s Division for Public Education and the National Council for Geographic Education, the Virtual Conference will provide innovative learning online for your professional growth.

Registration Rates

Members

  • Regular Registration $175
  • Student Registration $80
  • Retired Registration $95
Non-Members

  • Regular Registration $265
  • Student Registration $150

Non-members can join at the time of registration and receive the member rate.

Additional registration fees are required for the Associated Group meetings micro-sites: CUFA $30. NSSSA $25. IA $35.

A limited number of scholarships are available for first-time attendees.

Dec
7
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Dec 7 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Feb 15 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Dec
21
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Dec 21 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Mar 1 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.