All Events, Conferences & Workshops

As a service to members of the Massachusetts Council and the wider social studies community, third party events may be posted in this calendar. Third party events are not endorsed by the MCSS board.

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Oct
4
Sun
2020
2020 Northeast Regional Virtual Conference for the Social Studies @ Virtual
Oct 4 @ 9:45 am – 5:00 pm

Watch Ken Davis, David Hudson, and Dan Osborn on Facebook LIVE!

9:45 a.m. Webinar
Rob Powers, Plymouth Public Schools
.
11:00 a.m. Keynote Address
Ken C. Davis, author of Strongman and Don’t Know Much About book series
.
12:30 p.m. Keynote Address
Dr. Gorman Lee, Braintree Public Schools
.
2:00 p.m. Keynote Address
Dr. David L. Hudson, First Amendment Scholar, Visiting Associate Professor of Legal Practice at Belmont
.
3:30 p.m. Keynote Address
Dr. Daniel Osborn, Primary Source

 

Oct
5
Mon
2020
2020 Northeast Regional Virtual Conference for the Social Studies @ Virtual
Oct 5 @ 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm

3:00 p.m. Keynote Address
Under-represented voices and protest: From insignificance to significance
L’Merchie Frazier, Museum of African American History-Boston & Nantucket

4:15 p.m. Keynote Address
The interrelationship between an independent judiciary and free press
Justice Robert J. Cordy (retired), Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court

5:30 p.m. Keynote Address
The Equal Rights Amendment, 1920-2020
Barbara F. Berenson, Harvard Law School and author, Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement

 

Oct
6
Tue
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: The Civil War and Meaning of Liberty @ Virtual
Oct 6 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Presenter: Maureen Stephens, Mimi_Stephens@brown.edu 
The Choices Program at Brown University

The Civil War is a key event in U.S. history. Its causes can be traced to the colonial era; its legacies remain visible today. Join the Choices Program to explore the student readings, lessons, and videos in our Civil War and the Meaning of Liberty curriculum unit that help students consider the experiences of African Americans, women, and abolitionists during the war. Issues that drove the political confrontation over slavery and the meaning of liberty are also explored. We’ll try out an abbreviated lesson or two and discuss ways to adapt the unit to various classrooms.

A complimentary three-month digital editions license to the unit is provided to those who attend the webinar.  The trial can be started to coincide with when a participant actually teaches the Civil War.

If participants wish to have access to the unit after the trial, the cost is $45 for a two-year license.

 

NERCVirtual 2020: Developing Digital Citizenship Using Open Street Mapping (OSM) @ Virtual
Oct 6 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Presenter: Celeste Reynolds, creynolds@mpspk12.org & Steven Johnson
Mashpee Middle-High School

Date/Time of Session: 

  • Part 1: Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 2: Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 3: Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

It is necessary to teach students technologies that will empower them to become strong digital citizens. As this pertains to mapping, OpenStreetMap (OSM) provides educators and students a platform that allows them to become part of the global OSM community and help communities around the world. 

Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable communities, using open source software and data, to save lives. Introducing OSM to students in the classroom will not only teach them citizenship but also to be engaged in  service learning opportunities locally as well globally.  Incorporating OSM into the classroom provides an effective, low-cost, easy-to-use, and hands-on technology that will reinforce geographic concepts, spatial thinking skills, digital citizenship, and methods to use geospatial data to help solve problems. Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable areas around the world to save lives because there are communities around the world who have inadequate or incomplete maps.  

Students can become involved in providing spatial data in these areas which, in turn, unlocks the ability for communities to create maps which ultimately helps these communities make better decisions for their community. Using OSM in the classroom will provide a comprehensive approach to the technology that allows students to interactively learn about the geospatial system, plan a data collection effort, and integrate the collected data into a map that will be used by various organizations such as Red Cross, USAID, the United Nations and many more. 

The three part session  will provide proper training for teachers to learn about how they can use OSM in their classroom to improve student spatial thinking skills, empowering students to contribute to the world around them as digital citizens and ultimately saving lives.

Video to explain what is OpenStreetMap: https://youtu.be/d6n29CU2-Sg

MapGive:  https://youtu.be/C175zW8-6j8

 

Oct
7
Wed
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: Introduction to Action Civics @ Virtual
Oct 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Presenter: Jason Lofchie, jlofchie@generationcitizen.org 
Generation Citizen

This presentation explores an experiential, student-centered and project-based approach to civic education called Action Civics where students learn civics by doing civics and use their voice to make real change in their communities. Participants will learn strategies and discuss best practices for incorporating Action Civics in their school or district in a way that aligns with Common Core literacy standards and fits inside history, social studies or ELA curriculum so it reaches all students.

Resources:

NERCVirtual 2020: Tribal Citizens of Sovereign Nations: Indigenous Peoples in the U.S. @ Virtual
Oct 7 @ 4:15 pm – 6:15 pm

Presenters: Dr. Mishy Lesser and Professor Roger Paul
Upstander Project and University of Maine

Roger Paul (Passamaquoddy/Maliseet linguist, k-12 teacher, and faculty at the U. of Maine) and Dr. Mishy Lesser (co-founder of Upstander Project, learning director of the Emmy-award winning documentary film, Dawnland, and author of the 12-lesson Dawnland Teacher’s Guide) will facilitate a 2-hour workshop on issues that are of critical importance to those who want to elevate under-represented voices in American History, especially those of Indigenous peoples. Roger and Mishy’s presentation also addresses the conference theme of “Preparing Students to Hold The Office of Citizen” insofar as most non-Native teachers and students do not understand that Native people are members and/or citizens of sovereign nations. 

This workshop will look at sovereignty, nation-states, citizenship, dual citizenship, kinship ties, language recovery as survivance, and forced removal and coerced assimilation of Native children. The presenters will link the forced removal of Native children by state child welfare officials to the separation of children from their families at international borders. During the workshop participants will watch the 54-minute broadcast version of the Emmy-award winning film, Dawnland, which goes behind the scenes of the country’s first truth and reconciliation commission to address issues of importance to citizens and members of tribal nations.

Participants will receive a discount code for the purchase or rental of Dawnland and can download the free Dawnland Teacher’s Guide at upstanderproject.org. 

 

NERCVirtual 2020: Decision 2020-Strategies and Resources to Teach the Election @ Virtual
Oct 7 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Presenter: David Buchanan, david.buchanan@icivics.org, & Christian Scott
iCivics

With the election season now full steam ahead and many major issues demanding action, we have a unique opportunity to inspire students to truly “Hold the Office of Citizen” as active thoughtful voters.This interactive session will share examples from game-based learning, innovative curricula and other resources available for free from iCivics and other sources to illustrate engaging approaches to teaching the election, both in the classroom and through remote learning. As the featured educator for this session, Christian Scott, an experienced grade 8 teacher with Boston Public Schools, will share insights and suggestions gained from experience on how to make it all come alive in the classroom.  

Participants may access the full set of iCivics election resources that are available for free, including the popular game, Win the White House.

Audience: Middle and High School, Government and Civics, History

 

Oct
8
Thu
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: How We Argue @ Virtual
Oct 8 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Presenter: Nate Otey, otey@fas.harvard.edu
https://thinkeranalytix.org/

How We Argue: A workshop with Harvard Fellow Nate Otey

As we enter this fraught election season, educators want to discuss current issues and empower students to engage as active citizens. Yet, often when discussing controversial topics, students rely on unsubstantiated facts or emotional appeals, rather than evidence and reasoning. How can we teach students to listen respectfully and defend their views courageously – to cultivate both empathy and logical rigor? 

In this series of interactive workshops, Harvard Fellow Nate Otey will show you how to use a simple, powerful tool called argument mapping to help students develop and support their own claims, as well to better understand those with whom they disagree. Research from top universities shows that mapping significantly improves students’ critical thinking skills and may even decrease partisan polarization.  

Each workshop will center on a different controversial topic related to the upcoming election. Here is the tentative schedule: 

  • October 8, 3pm: Defund the police?
  • October 15, 3pm: Abolish ICE, or build the wall?
  • October 22, 3pm: Universal mail-in voting

Participants will leave these workshops with simple, practical tools to help students discuss current issues with precision and care.

 

NERCVirtual 2020: People Count: Understanding Demography in the Year of the Census @ Virtual
Oct 8 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 am

Presenter: Rafael Woldeab, rwoldeab@popconnect.org, & Peter Bailey
https://populationeducation.org/ 

In this year of the decennial census, discover interdisciplinary, hands-on lessons for teaching about U.S. population trends and projections, and how they relate to our communities, economy, environment and public policy, including political representation. Build students’ skills in identifying non-biased data sources, data representation through modeling and simulations, and data analysis that applies to geography, history and civics. Sample activities include an analysis of historical census data, weighing arguments for how Congressional representation should be determined (including a gerrymandering activity), and creating age-sex distribution graphs to represent the U.S. population at different points in history. Receive lesson plans in an electronic format, matched to state standards and the C3 Framework. All of the presented activities work well in both the in-person and virtual classroom.

All of the webinar participants will receive an access code to a password-protected website that will house the activities and background materials I will present in the webinar. They will have access to this indefinitely.

 

NERCVirtual 2020: Civic Engagement in Action @ Virtual
Oct 8 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Presenter: Ann Marie Strode & Kelly Cook
Bourne Public Schools

How do we empower students to be civically engaged? This question was explored in 10th grade history classes at Bourne High School through the Civics Action Project. This presentation will discuss the process of getting this work started in your classrooms, how to get students excited about using their voice to make change, and how to showcase this work for public viewing. There are two main GOALS of this project: 1) Students recognize that their voice, no matter how quiet, can be an agent of change. 2) No matter the outcome of the individual project, students learn that the process to generate awareness of an issue is powerful.  

Participants will walk away with a resource guide for students, templates for research and action plans, and ideas for showcasing student work.  Our goal is to share with others our experience as teachers through the work of our students. 

Audience: Middle and high school, all subjects

Theme: Preparing Our Students to Hold “The Office of Citizen”

 

Oct
12
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – Dec 21 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Oct
13
Tue
2020
NERCVirtual 2020 Keynote Address: Social Science Classrooms Around Activist Thinking @ Virtual
Oct 13 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Keynote Speaker: Christopher C. Martell, christopher.martell@umb.edu 

Social studies has long been the primary school subject for preparing students for democratic life. However, it has not always included a focus on equity and justice in the definition of what makes a good citizen. In this keynote, Chris Martell will describe what it means to “think like an activist” and highlight the need for social studies classrooms to be built around three core concepts: social inquiry, critical multiculturalism, and transformative democratic citizenship. He will provide examples of history and social science teachers helping students see how activism was used in the past to seek justice, how past social movements connect to the present, and how democratic tools can be used to change society.

Bibliography: Christopher C. Martell is an assistant professor of social studies education at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He was a high school social studies teacher for 11 years, including 8 years in the Framingham Public Schools, an urban district west of Boston. Before joining UMass Boston, he was a professor at Boston University. Chris is the author of the book Teaching History for Justice: Centering Activism in Students’ Study of the Past and the editor of the book Social Studies Teacher Education: Critical Issues and Current Perspectives. His scholarly work has been featured in numerous peer-reviewed journals and books. His research examines teacher education across the career-span, with a specific focus on social justice pedagogy and inquiry-based instruction in the history classroom.

NERCVirtual 2020: Developing Digital Citizenship Using Open Street Mapping (OSM) @ Virtual
Oct 13 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Presenter: Celeste Reynolds, creynolds@mpspk12.org & Steven Johnson
Mashpee Middle-High School

Date/Time of Session: 

  • Part 1: Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 2: Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 3: Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

It is necessary to teach students technologies that will empower them to become strong digital citizens. As this pertains to mapping, OpenStreetMap (OSM) provides educators and students a platform that allows them to become part of the global OSM community and help communities around the world. 

Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable communities, using open source software and data, to save lives. Introducing OSM to students in the classroom will not only teach them citizenship but also to be engaged in  service learning opportunities locally as well globally.  Incorporating OSM into the classroom provides an effective, low-cost, easy-to-use, and hands-on technology that will reinforce geographic concepts, spatial thinking skills, digital citizenship, and methods to use geospatial data to help solve problems. Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable areas around the world to save lives because there are communities around the world who have inadequate or incomplete maps.  

Students can become involved in providing spatial data in these areas which, in turn, unlocks the ability for communities to create maps which ultimately helps these communities make better decisions for their community. Using OSM in the classroom will provide a comprehensive approach to the technology that allows students to interactively learn about the geospatial system, plan a data collection effort, and integrate the collected data into a map that will be used by various organizations such as Red Cross, USAID, the United Nations and many more. 

The three part session  will provide proper training for teachers to learn about how they can use OSM in their classroom to improve student spatial thinking skills, empowering students to contribute to the world around them as digital citizens and ultimately saving lives.

Video to explain what is OpenStreetMap: https://youtu.be/d6n29CU2-Sg

MapGive:  https://youtu.be/C175zW8-6j8

 

NERCVirtual 2020: Developing Active Global Citizens @ Virtual
Oct 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Presenter: Dr. Evan Saperstein, evan.saperstein@gmail.com
William Paterson University & Wayne Township Schools

This presentation proposes a secondary level elective course on global citizenship based on the findings of a qualitative, interpretivist case study at an urban New Jersey public high school. Based on observations, interviews, and document analysis, the proposed course would cover: 1) Introduction to Global Citizenship; 2) Sustainable Development; 3) Poverty and World Hunger; 4) Global Health Issues; 5) Child Mortality; 6) Peace and Conflict; 7) Human Rights and Gender Equality; 8) Universal Education; 9) Liberal Democratic Governance and Rights; 10) Global Citizenship Action Plan. This presentation also will stress the need for more research on global citizenship, global citizenship education, global studies training and certification programs, experiential learning, and the connection between global citizenship and liberal democratic governance and values.    

 

Theme: Preparing Students to Hold “The Office of Citizen”

Audience: High School, Teacher Training, Administrators

 

Biography: Dr. Evan Saperstein is an adjunct professor at William Paterson University and a social studies teacher in New Jersey.  Dr. Saperstein holds a B.A. in History from McGill University, an M.A. in Modern European Studies from Columbia University, and a doctorate in education from Northeastern University.  Dr. Saperstein’s doctoral dissertation explored perceptions and experiences of global citizenship education.  Dr. Saperstein has published articles in scholarly journals and presented at conferences on global citizenship education in the United States and abroad.  

 

Oct
15
Thu
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: How We Argue @ Virtual
Oct 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Presenter: Nate Otey, otey@fas.harvard.edu
https://thinkeranalytix.org/

How We Argue: A workshop with Harvard Fellow Nate Otey

As we enter this fraught election season, educators want to discuss current issues and empower students to engage as active citizens. Yet, often when discussing controversial topics, students rely on unsubstantiated facts or emotional appeals, rather than evidence and reasoning. How can we teach students to listen respectfully and defend their views courageously – to cultivate both empathy and logical rigor? 

In this series of interactive workshops, Harvard Fellow Nate Otey will show you how to use a simple, powerful tool called argument mapping to help students develop and support their own claims, as well to better understand those with whom they disagree. Research from top universities shows that mapping significantly improves students’ critical thinking skills and may even decrease partisan polarization.  

Each workshop will center on a different controversial topic related to the upcoming election. Here is the tentative schedule: 

  • October 8, 3pm: Defund the police?
  • October 15, 3pm: Abolish ICE, or build the wall?
  • October 22, 3pm: Universal mail-in voting

Participants will leave these workshops with simple, practical tools to help students discuss current issues with precision and care.