All Events, Conferences & Workshops

As a service to members of the Massachusetts Council and the wider social studies community, third party events may be posted in this calendar. Third party events are not endorsed by the MCSS board.

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Oct
8
Thu
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: How We Argue @ Virtual
Oct 8 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Presenter: Nate Otey, otey@fas.harvard.edu
https://thinkeranalytix.org/

How We Argue: A workshop with Harvard Fellow Nate Otey

As we enter this fraught election season, educators want to discuss current issues and empower students to engage as active citizens. Yet, often when discussing controversial topics, students rely on unsubstantiated facts or emotional appeals, rather than evidence and reasoning. How can we teach students to listen respectfully and defend their views courageously – to cultivate both empathy and logical rigor? 

In this series of interactive workshops, Harvard Fellow Nate Otey will show you how to use a simple, powerful tool called argument mapping to help students develop and support their own claims, as well to better understand those with whom they disagree. Research from top universities shows that mapping significantly improves students’ critical thinking skills and may even decrease partisan polarization.  

Each workshop will center on a different controversial topic related to the upcoming election. Here is the tentative schedule: 

  • October 8, 3pm: Defund the police?
  • October 15, 3pm: Abolish ICE, or build the wall?
  • October 22, 3pm: Universal mail-in voting

Participants will leave these workshops with simple, practical tools to help students discuss current issues with precision and care.

 

NERCVirtual 2020: People Count: Understanding Demography in the Year of the Census @ Virtual
Oct 8 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 am

Presenter: Rafael Woldeab, rwoldeab@popconnect.org, & Peter Bailey
https://populationeducation.org/ 

In this year of the decennial census, discover interdisciplinary, hands-on lessons for teaching about U.S. population trends and projections, and how they relate to our communities, economy, environment and public policy, including political representation. Build students’ skills in identifying non-biased data sources, data representation through modeling and simulations, and data analysis that applies to geography, history and civics. Sample activities include an analysis of historical census data, weighing arguments for how Congressional representation should be determined (including a gerrymandering activity), and creating age-sex distribution graphs to represent the U.S. population at different points in history. Receive lesson plans in an electronic format, matched to state standards and the C3 Framework. All of the presented activities work well in both the in-person and virtual classroom.

All of the webinar participants will receive an access code to a password-protected website that will house the activities and background materials I will present in the webinar. They will have access to this indefinitely.

 

NERCVirtual 2020: Civic Engagement in Action @ Virtual
Oct 8 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Presenter: Ann Marie Strode & Kelly Cook
Bourne Public Schools

How do we empower students to be civically engaged? This question was explored in 10th grade history classes at Bourne High School through the Civics Action Project. This presentation will discuss the process of getting this work started in your classrooms, how to get students excited about using their voice to make change, and how to showcase this work for public viewing. There are two main GOALS of this project: 1) Students recognize that their voice, no matter how quiet, can be an agent of change. 2) No matter the outcome of the individual project, students learn that the process to generate awareness of an issue is powerful.  

Participants will walk away with a resource guide for students, templates for research and action plans, and ideas for showcasing student work.  Our goal is to share with others our experience as teachers through the work of our students. 

Audience: Middle and high school, all subjects

Theme: Preparing Our Students to Hold “The Office of Citizen”

 

Oct
12
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – Dec 21 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Oct
13
Tue
2020
NERCVirtual 2020 Keynote Address: Social Science Classrooms Around Activist Thinking @ Virtual
Oct 13 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Keynote Speaker: Christopher C. Martell, christopher.martell@umb.edu 

Social studies has long been the primary school subject for preparing students for democratic life. However, it has not always included a focus on equity and justice in the definition of what makes a good citizen. In this keynote, Chris Martell will describe what it means to “think like an activist” and highlight the need for social studies classrooms to be built around three core concepts: social inquiry, critical multiculturalism, and transformative democratic citizenship. He will provide examples of history and social science teachers helping students see how activism was used in the past to seek justice, how past social movements connect to the present, and how democratic tools can be used to change society.

Bibliography: Christopher C. Martell is an assistant professor of social studies education at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He was a high school social studies teacher for 11 years, including 8 years in the Framingham Public Schools, an urban district west of Boston. Before joining UMass Boston, he was a professor at Boston University. Chris is the author of the book Teaching History for Justice: Centering Activism in Students’ Study of the Past and the editor of the book Social Studies Teacher Education: Critical Issues and Current Perspectives. His scholarly work has been featured in numerous peer-reviewed journals and books. His research examines teacher education across the career-span, with a specific focus on social justice pedagogy and inquiry-based instruction in the history classroom.

NERCVirtual 2020: Developing Digital Citizenship Using Open Street Mapping (OSM) @ Virtual
Oct 13 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Presenter: Celeste Reynolds, creynolds@mpspk12.org & Steven Johnson
Mashpee Middle-High School

Date/Time of Session: 

  • Part 1: Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 2: Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 3: Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

It is necessary to teach students technologies that will empower them to become strong digital citizens. As this pertains to mapping, OpenStreetMap (OSM) provides educators and students a platform that allows them to become part of the global OSM community and help communities around the world. 

Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable communities, using open source software and data, to save lives. Introducing OSM to students in the classroom will not only teach them citizenship but also to be engaged in  service learning opportunities locally as well globally.  Incorporating OSM into the classroom provides an effective, low-cost, easy-to-use, and hands-on technology that will reinforce geographic concepts, spatial thinking skills, digital citizenship, and methods to use geospatial data to help solve problems. Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable areas around the world to save lives because there are communities around the world who have inadequate or incomplete maps.  

Students can become involved in providing spatial data in these areas which, in turn, unlocks the ability for communities to create maps which ultimately helps these communities make better decisions for their community. Using OSM in the classroom will provide a comprehensive approach to the technology that allows students to interactively learn about the geospatial system, plan a data collection effort, and integrate the collected data into a map that will be used by various organizations such as Red Cross, USAID, the United Nations and many more. 

The three part session  will provide proper training for teachers to learn about how they can use OSM in their classroom to improve student spatial thinking skills, empowering students to contribute to the world around them as digital citizens and ultimately saving lives.

Video to explain what is OpenStreetMap: https://youtu.be/d6n29CU2-Sg

MapGive:  https://youtu.be/C175zW8-6j8

 

NERCVirtual 2020: Developing Active Global Citizens @ Virtual
Oct 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Presenter: Dr. Evan Saperstein, evan.saperstein@gmail.com
William Paterson University & Wayne Township Schools

This presentation proposes a secondary level elective course on global citizenship based on the findings of a qualitative, interpretivist case study at an urban New Jersey public high school. Based on observations, interviews, and document analysis, the proposed course would cover: 1) Introduction to Global Citizenship; 2) Sustainable Development; 3) Poverty and World Hunger; 4) Global Health Issues; 5) Child Mortality; 6) Peace and Conflict; 7) Human Rights and Gender Equality; 8) Universal Education; 9) Liberal Democratic Governance and Rights; 10) Global Citizenship Action Plan. This presentation also will stress the need for more research on global citizenship, global citizenship education, global studies training and certification programs, experiential learning, and the connection between global citizenship and liberal democratic governance and values.    

 

Theme: Preparing Students to Hold “The Office of Citizen”

Audience: High School, Teacher Training, Administrators

 

Biography: Dr. Evan Saperstein is an adjunct professor at William Paterson University and a social studies teacher in New Jersey.  Dr. Saperstein holds a B.A. in History from McGill University, an M.A. in Modern European Studies from Columbia University, and a doctorate in education from Northeastern University.  Dr. Saperstein’s doctoral dissertation explored perceptions and experiences of global citizenship education.  Dr. Saperstein has published articles in scholarly journals and presented at conferences on global citizenship education in the United States and abroad.  

 

Oct
15
Thu
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: How We Argue @ Virtual
Oct 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Presenter: Nate Otey, otey@fas.harvard.edu
https://thinkeranalytix.org/

How We Argue: A workshop with Harvard Fellow Nate Otey

As we enter this fraught election season, educators want to discuss current issues and empower students to engage as active citizens. Yet, often when discussing controversial topics, students rely on unsubstantiated facts or emotional appeals, rather than evidence and reasoning. How can we teach students to listen respectfully and defend their views courageously – to cultivate both empathy and logical rigor? 

In this series of interactive workshops, Harvard Fellow Nate Otey will show you how to use a simple, powerful tool called argument mapping to help students develop and support their own claims, as well to better understand those with whom they disagree. Research from top universities shows that mapping significantly improves students’ critical thinking skills and may even decrease partisan polarization.  

Each workshop will center on a different controversial topic related to the upcoming election. Here is the tentative schedule: 

  • October 8, 3pm: Defund the police?
  • October 15, 3pm: Abolish ICE, or build the wall?
  • October 22, 3pm: Universal mail-in voting

Participants will leave these workshops with simple, practical tools to help students discuss current issues with precision and care.

 

Oct
22
Thu
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: How We Argue @ Virtual
Oct 22 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Presenter: Nate Otey, otey@fas.harvard.edu
https://thinkeranalytix.org/

How We Argue: A workshop with Harvard Fellow Nate Otey

As we enter this fraught election season, educators want to discuss current issues and empower students to engage as active citizens. Yet, often when discussing controversial topics, students rely on unsubstantiated facts or emotional appeals, rather than evidence and reasoning. How can we teach students to listen respectfully and defend their views courageously – to cultivate both empathy and logical rigor? 

In this series of interactive workshops, Harvard Fellow Nate Otey will show you how to use a simple, powerful tool called argument mapping to help students develop and support their own claims, as well to better understand those with whom they disagree. Research from top universities shows that mapping significantly improves students’ critical thinking skills and may even decrease partisan polarization.  

Each workshop will center on a different controversial topic related to the upcoming election. Here is the tentative schedule: 

  • October 8, 3pm: Defund the police?
  • October 15, 3pm: Abolish ICE, or build the wall?
  • October 22, 3pm: Universal mail-in voting

Participants will leave these workshops with simple, practical tools to help students discuss current issues with precision and care.

 

Oct
26
Mon
2020
Twenty-two Hundred Miles of Canada-U.S. Shared Water Collaborations & Issues @ virtual
Oct 26 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Twenty-two Hundred Miles of Canada-U.S. Shared Water Collaborations & Issues

Monday, October 26, 2020 at 3:00 p.m. [Register here]
Betsy Arntzen, arntzen@maine.edu
University of Maine – Canadian-American Center
60 minute workshop

The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence system is North America’s largest waterway. How have two countries maintained collaboration over 84% of North America’s surface freshwater and the shared inland-sea transportation network? Handouts.

This session will unpack and explore the results of 8 states’, 2 provinces’, 2 nations’ legal, economic, and environmental agreements in their shared water boundaries and in matters of controlling 20% of the world’s available fresh surface water, and along the longest border shared by any two countries in the world.

 

Theme: Preparing Students to Hold “The Office of Citizen”
Audience: K-12, all subjects; Middle School geography.

Navigating Political Polarization in the United States @ virtual
Oct 26 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Navigating Political Polarization in the United States

Monday, October 26, 2020 at 4:!5 p.m. [Register here]
Dustin Tenreiro, dustin_tenreiro@facinghistory.org
One hour webinar

Americans are increasingly divided over politics. The gap between the policies endorsed by the Republican and Democratic Parties is growing, as is animosity between people who identify with different parties. In this workshop, we will explore the questions: How is polarization influencing decision-making and civic life in the United States? and Can Americans still find common ground? Facing History and Ourselves will provide tools and resources you can use in your classroom that foster civil discourse and support a critical understanding of political polarization in the United States.

Audience: Middle & High School
Theme: Teaching the 2020 U.S. Elections

NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 26 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Jan 4 2021 @ 8:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Oct
27
Tue
2020
Resource Ready with the Massachusetts Civic Learning Coalition @ virtual
Oct 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Resource Ready with the Massachusetts Civic Learning Coalition

Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at 3:00 p.m. [Register here]
Casey Cullen and David Buchanan, Massachusetts Civic Learning Coalition
One hour webinar

With the Covid-19 pandemic, the campaign for racial justice, climate change and so many other major issues of this moment in time the need to renew the social contract grows more urgent every day. Education plays a key role in making that happen. The Massachusetts Civic Learning Coalition (MCLC) is here to support you in this critical work. During this session, representatives from the MCLC will highlight resources from many different organizations to build on the growing momentum for civics in Massachusetts schools. This session is for all educators seeking to establish new pathways for civic engagement in their district and looking to fortify old ones. Join us to learn more about the work of the MCLC and the resources available to make civics learning come alive in your classroom –  whether it’s virtual or in person.

Exploring the Role of Religion in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Religious Literacy as a Means and Ends for Civic Competency @ virtual
Oct 27 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Exploring the Role of Religion in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Religious Literacy as a Means and Ends for Civic Competency

Tuesday, October 27, 2020 at 4:15 p.m. [Register here]
Kate Soules, ksoules@religionanded.com,  & David Rhodes,  drhodes@gse.harvard.edu
Two-hour workshop

While there has been increasing attention to diversity, equity, and inclusion in public education, the impact of religion is often invisible or overlooked. Further, the study of religion is inextricably tied to many topics and themes in the social studies and history classroom, and religious diversity is deeply embedded in public life, individual and community identities, and current events. However, many teachers are apprehensive of any discussion of religion.  When teachers lack confidence in how to address religion in the classroom and curriculum, they often avoid the topic altogether for fear of overstepping boundaries or revealing their own lack of knowledge.  This has significant implications for students’ development of essential skills and knowledge which, in turn, impacts their civic engagement.

This workshop will introduce educators to the principles of religious liberty in public schools and key frameworks of religious literacy so that they can support students in the development of the knowledge and skills crucial for engaged citizenship in a religiously plural society.

Unpacking Religious Literacy for Educators

In these times of upheaval, it becomes increasingly important for teachers to understand the roles that religion plays in the lives of students and to develop their own religious literacy. We will examine what the concept of “religious literacy” means, particularly for educators. Once we break down religious literacy into manageable components, participants will explore various resources that can deepen their own knowledge and be adapted for use in the classroom. Ultimately, we will provide a roadmap for continued learning beyond the workshop. Participants will receive a tool to evaluate their own religious literacy and will be encouraged to arrange follow-up consultations with instructors to discuss strategies for ongoing learning and application in their particular contexts.

NERCVirtual 2020: Developing Digital Citizenship Using Open Street Mapping (OSM) @ Virtual
Oct 27 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

Presenter: Celeste Reynolds, creynolds@mpspk12.org & Steven Johnson
Mashpee Middle-High School

Date/Time of Session: 

  • Part 1: Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 2: Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
  • Part 3: Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

It is necessary to teach students technologies that will empower them to become strong digital citizens. As this pertains to mapping, OpenStreetMap (OSM) provides educators and students a platform that allows them to become part of the global OSM community and help communities around the world. 

Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable communities, using open source software and data, to save lives. Introducing OSM to students in the classroom will not only teach them citizenship but also to be engaged in  service learning opportunities locally as well globally.  Incorporating OSM into the classroom provides an effective, low-cost, easy-to-use, and hands-on technology that will reinforce geographic concepts, spatial thinking skills, digital citizenship, and methods to use geospatial data to help solve problems. Today there is a global initiative to map vulnerable areas around the world to save lives because there are communities around the world who have inadequate or incomplete maps.  

Students can become involved in providing spatial data in these areas which, in turn, unlocks the ability for communities to create maps which ultimately helps these communities make better decisions for their community. Using OSM in the classroom will provide a comprehensive approach to the technology that allows students to interactively learn about the geospatial system, plan a data collection effort, and integrate the collected data into a map that will be used by various organizations such as Red Cross, USAID, the United Nations and many more. 

The three part session  will provide proper training for teachers to learn about how they can use OSM in their classroom to improve student spatial thinking skills, empowering students to contribute to the world around them as digital citizens and ultimately saving lives.

Video to explain what is OpenStreetMap: https://youtu.be/d6n29CU2-Sg

MapGive:  https://youtu.be/C175zW8-6j8