Third Party Events

Oct
12
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – Dec 21 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Oct
26
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Oct 26 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Jan 4 2021 @ 8:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Nov
9
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Nov 9 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Jan 18 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Nov
23
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Nov 23 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Feb 1 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Dec
4
Fri
2020
2020 NCSS Virtual Conference @ virtual
Dec 4 – Dec 6 all-day

2021 marks 100 years of NCSS service to social studies teachers, administrators, and professionals.

To celebrate this moment in the history of social studies education, NCSS is planning a year-long experience of signature events, starting with our first-ever NCSS Virtual Conference: Advancing Social Justice from December 4-6, 2020. With our partners, the American Bar Association’s Division for Public Education and the National Council for Geographic Education, the Virtual Conference will provide innovative learning online for your professional growth.

Registration Rates

Members

  • Regular Registration $175
  • Student Registration $80
  • Retired Registration $95
Non-Members

  • Regular Registration $265
  • Student Registration $150

Non-members can join at the time of registration and receive the member rate.

Additional registration fees are required for the Associated Group meetings micro-sites: CUFA $30. NSSSA $25. IA $35.

A limited number of scholarships are available for first-time attendees.

Dec
7
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Dec 7 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Feb 15 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.  

 

Dec
21
Mon
2020
NERCVirtual 2020: From Labor Songs to Black Lives Matter and Beyond: Protest Songs and the American Protest Movement [Master Class] @ Virtual
Dec 21 2020 @ 7:00 pm – Mar 1 2021 @ 9:00 pm

Presenter: Steve Armstrong, stevearmstrong512@gmail.com
Connecticut State Department of Education


During these six sessions participants will study ways that music has been critical to virtually every protest movement in the United States and how protest songs are an invaluable tool that can be used to analyze various protest movements. Music from the labor movement, the anti-war movement of the 1950s and 1960s, the civil rights movement and the women’s movement will all be carefully analyzed. We will study music that has been heard in the protests around the country this year as well as labor songs that were sung in the 1910s. A careful analysis of the music and the lyrics of these songs will take place. We will also discuss the power of protest music, and the reasons why music is such an important component of almost every American protest movement. Participants will be asked to find music from additional American protest movements and share with other participants.  If participants want to wonder “how” to use music in the social studies classroom, these sessions will explain that.

Steve Armstrong is a lifetime classroom teacher at the high school and college level, and is a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. He has given many workshops to teachers at the state, regional, and national levels on using music in the social studies classroom.  Steve has worked as a consultant at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and has done many workshops on music in the classroom at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, located at the site of the original Woodstock Music Festival.